What Your Stay Could Look Like
 Possible Characteristics of Your Experience
 Being Remote in the Wilderness
 Interesting Groups & Amazing People

                    


What Your Stay Could Look Like

The Wilderness Centre is just that—a small remote place in nature where people can come to engage with the wilderness in whatever way they would like to. Many people just want to get away from all the crowds of people and materialism that generally fills most of our lives, in order to have a relaxing or rejuvenating experience in the wilderness. For them, mountain accommodation in one of our historic heritage cabins, or perhaps even a teepee, is ideal. They can relax at their cabin or head out on an out-trip on their own time, pace, and schedule.

Some people have never been to Canada or the Rockies before and want to see, hear, feel, smell, or taste a little more of the mountain wilderness with an experienced and certified guide. For them, guided hikes & adventures are ideal. They can experience the new surroundings with a trained professional and learn a lot about it along the way.

There are also people for whom the wilderness is a reflection of their souls, and they want to experience it in a way that also significantly connects to or leaves an impression on this internal “wilderness." For them, nature-based education & arts are ideal. In these experiences, mountain accommodations, guided hikes, and adventures are also enhanced with new activities and perspectives about being in nature that can also promote a new dimension of self-awareness. This added dimension can be not only rejuvenating, but inspirational and riotous amounts of fun.

And there are other people who recognize that culture is essentially a reflection of our relationship with the land, and they want to experience the wilderness in a way that also engages their life-path in its cultural, communal, and global context. For them, inter-cultural sharing & life ways opportunities are ideal. They have the opportunity to be remote in the wilderness, enjoying many hikes and adventures, as well as learning with various cultural and community leaders—often including a First Nations Elder from a First Nations community of this region or elsewhere in Canada—in a way that touches on not only our relationships with the landscape or ourselves, but also on our relationships with others; in our families, communities, and world.

Often, it is the case that many of these diverse experiences in the wilderness at CrossRiver overlap with each other, and this is also why we are not so concerned with strict and structured itineraries while out here, necessarily. It is frequently the case that after planning and booking a certain kind of stay then arriving at the Wilderness Centre, guests’ initial plans begin to evolve, where possible, based not on a printed piece of paper, but significantly on the new relationships that occur while here, whether those relationships be with the land or with other people. This movement is encouraged by us if it happens to you (though it certainly does not need to), and is part of the unique versatility of the Wilderness Centre itself, the wilderness around us, and our unique staff and friends.

Lastly, depending on when you book your stay for, catered or self-catered options are also available. When we do the catering, our meals are made with natural and organic foods and natural or wild meats, whenever possible. We have a small organic garden on site that provides us with fresh herbs and salads, whenever possible. Personal diet restrictions and requests can also be accommodated. For coffee lovers, we use only locally roasted organic, fair trade, coffee beans, or else organic coffee beans we receive by true fair trade directly from the indigenous peoples of Columbia themselves. Throughout the day—whether at the Wilderness Centre, or on the rivers or trails—all meals are creative, traditional for the region when possible, and prepared daily by experienced cooks (see more about our meals here on the accommodation pages).

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Possible Charcteristics of Your Experience











 

































Comfortable and environmentally-sustainable heritage cabin or teepee accommodation

Outdoor wood-fired hot tub with views of mountains across the Kootenay Valley

Relaxing and peaceful time alone with a partner, the family, friends, a journal, good book, or nature, in a picturesque and secluded mountain setting

Remote day hiking to alpine and sub-alpine meadows, lakes, ridges, peaks, or passes

Secluded backpacking along un-travelled trails to wilderness places with absolutely no people

Whitewater rafting on a variety of rivers

Wildlife viewing

Mountain biking

Sightseeing the nearby world-famous tourist attractions, such as Banff, Lake Louise, or the Columbia Icefield; or even taking in some of the more localized favorites, such as the Radium or Lussier Hot Springs, the Columbia River wetlands, Windermere Lake, Invermere, Kimberley, or Fort Steele

Inter-cultural sharing with indigenous Elders or other community and cultural leaders from around the world, and from all cultures and nations, whether the white nations, the black nations, the yellow nations, or the red nations

Storytellers of regional history, First Nations history and legend, and mountain life

A variety of singers, musicians, performers, artists, writers, and skilled crafts people

Wilderness skills, such as navigation; shelter building; tanning; fire building; and medicinal and edible plant use

Experiential and nature-based education tied into school curriculums or youth organization objectives

Traditional and natural crafts and skills opportunities or retreats, such as cedar weaving; bark basketry; hide smoking; open-fire and pit cooking; dreamcatcher making; drumming and drum making; folk art painting; and wood working 

Keynote session facilitators, retreats, or conferences based around Rocky Mountain life and geology; local wildlife and biology; inter-cultural sharing and learning; and arts, culture, and nature

General experiences, campfires, games, activities, and gatherings that encourage awareness about our relationship with nature and each other

Exceptionally delicious meals prepared daily by our experienced mountain cook with organic, natural, traditional, and wild foods


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Being Remote in the Wilderness

One of the most common surprises guests receive when arriving at CrossRiver is how remote we are in the Rocky Mountains, even though there is road access. If you are a possible guest reading this, and live outside Canada or mainly in a city, nothing that is said here will be able to prepare you for what you are about to feel when you arrive here in person and experience wilderness like this—there are very few places left on the earth where this is possible, even elsewhere in the Canadian Rockies. We are not situated on the side of any busy highway that gets conveniently left out of our facility descriptions, nor are we adjacent to any crowded cities, hotels, or attractions that get conveniently left out of our marketing pictures. Every now and then loggers or miners use the road near us, which is still half a kilometer away from the Wilderness Centre, and there are other (mainly local), hikers, travellers, and adventurers that we sometimes cross paths with, but this is basically it—just us and the wilderness. We consider this unique quality of remoteness in nature an incredible gift. It opens up many more doors to us for such things as wildlife viewing; inspirational and intimate encounters with scenery and the landscape; environmental education; and personal rejuvenation or wellness opportunities. Safety is also a very important concern of ours in the wilderness, and our knowledgeable, trained, and experienced staff are always available to help whenever there might be a concern or fear with the new surroundings. They are certainly something to be respected, and when this is done, the opportunities for enjoyment are greatly increased—we speak from experience. In the almost 20 years we’ve been out here, many people who have arrived with concerns or fears, have left with an unexpected peace and happiness—like a weight has been lifted from their shoulders—that has sometimes cleared the way for a whole new perspective about what it means to live on this earth with nature in our lives. Some popular characteristics of being with nature at our remote wilderness location have included: the colours and variety of wildflowers in July; the sound of the nearby trickling creek; the picturesque mountain views all around; and the momentous chance sightings of the abundant wildlife, such as bears; deer; elk; cougars; wolves; lynx; bobcats; moose; eagles; all sorts of other birds; marmots; and wolverines.

 

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Interesting Groups & Amazing People

If meeting new people is something that is important to you while visiting CrossRiver, there will be the opportunity to gather with people and cultures from all around the world at any given time throughout the summer. The Wilderness Centre itself is a small facility designed more for community and peace, rather than large-scale crowds. Generally, there will never be any more than 20-30 people at the centre at any one time. Therefore, guests also have the ease to balance meeting new people with the ability to relax or engage in nature alone, as a couple, with the family, or in a small group. This quality of CrossRiver is an endearing one and has frequently become a tremendously unique gift for guests, where peacefulness, lasting friendships, and connections with others have been common occurrences. Examples of some past guests have included people from all parts of Canada and the USA; England; Germany; The Netherlands; Italy; South Africa; Belgium; Poland; Austria; Columbia; France; Japan; Brazil; Australia; and New Zealand. Furthermore, these people have included conservation workers; journalists; lawyers; business people; teachers; students; full-time parents; children; doctors; artists; musicians; actors; TV personalities; retired grandparents; scientists; film makers; engineers; and travel agents.


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